Building Codes

Turning Down the Lights
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Turning Down the Lights

New York City has been a leader in sustainability policy under Mayor Michael... More

Rubik Code, Part Two
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Rubik Code, Part Two

In the first part of this article, which appeared in the July/August 2010 issue,... More

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Organizations Partner to Develop U.S. Green Building Code

With a shared interest in developing green building guidelines, a group of like-minded building professionals, energy and lighting engineers, sustainability advocates, architects, and standards writers have come together to develop a comprehensive model green building code designed to advance green building practices across the United States. The organizations involved are the International Code Council (ICC); the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE); the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC); the American Institute of Architects (AIA); and the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES). These groups have launched the International Green Construction Code (IGCC), representing the merger of two national efforts to develop adoptable and enforceable green building codes. More

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Three States Adopt 2008 NEC

The new code, to be adopted by Colo., Ken., and Wyo., adds requirements for the inclusion of arc-fault circuit interrupters and tamper-resistant outlets. See nema.org for more information on the new code. More

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Light and Health Symposium
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Daylighting Required?

This is an interesting question and could be answered on many different levels. More

Let the Sun Shine in
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CheckMate ET1

Remote-control testing of existing exit signs and emergency lighting wall packs is available with the use of CheckMate ET1. From up to 32 feet away, users can test both 30-second and 90-minute options to satisfy building safety codes. The unit attaches directly to existing signs and wall packs, and measures approximately 4 inches long by 1 1/4 inches wide by 1 inch high. More

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Codes: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

No matter the type of project, one thing is clear: lighting energy codes are not going away. Designers must learn to communicate with regulatory agencies as they seek a balance between efficiency and creativity. More

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Solatube Receives Miami-Dade County Approval

line of tubular skylight products now meets the Miami-Dade County Product Approval System, a rigorous set of testing procedures for South Florida established in 1991. Solutube's NOA is available at the company's website, More

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