Mastering Sidelight, Part Two

A 3-D view analysis of an urban site. Primary view corridors are mapped along with overshadowing buildings, prevailing winds, and the annual sun path, allowing evaluation of the viewshed in context of other considerations present.

In each of these three rooms all window apertures have the same effective aperture.

In each of these three rooms all window apertures have the same effective aperture.

To balance the separate functions of daylight and view, the daylight window is positioned above eye-level, and the view window is centered at eye-level and below.

A 2-D view analysis of the same site, however, equidistant projection is used to map onto a flat plane to simplify its reading.

This generic room illustrates the split window strategy, which separates and balances view and daylight function.

In this plan view, an occupant looks through a 20 percent WWR placed 25 feet away and another wall twice the distance with a 35 percent WWR, yet sees an image with the same apparent size.

An example, on the right, of low-VT glazing used for a high luminance partly cloudy sky and light building surface. On the left is a medium-VT glazing used for a low luminance overcast sky and dark building surface.

Window wall with variable height aperture framing view of the sky

Window wall with variable height aperture framing view of the horizon.

Window wall with variable height aperture framing view of the earth (6C).

In each of these three rooms all window apertures have the same effective aperture.

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