Environmental Protection Agency

The Benefits of Natural Light
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The Benefits of Natural Light

Research supports daylighting's positive effect on building performance and human... Read more

Get Caught Up on Green Building Rating Systems
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Get Caught Up on Green Building Rating Systems

You may know the forthcoming LEED v4 inside and out, but other green building... Read more

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iGuzzini Joins LRC's Partners Program

Italian lighting company iGuzzini has joined Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's Lighting Research Center's (LRC) Partners Program. The program is designed to coordinate the efforts of public and private organizations to advance lighting research, education, and technology. Read more

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L.A. Is No. 1 on EPA List

The EPA releases a list of the top 25 U.S. cities with the largest number of Energy Star buildings. Read more

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EPA and DOE Kick Off Change a Light Tour

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began the 10-city, 20-day Energy Star Change a Light Bus Tour on October 3, 2007 (dubbed Change a Light Day), to promote Energy Star's message that using energy-efficient lighting products is an easy way for homeowners to fight climate change. The Change a Light Bus Tour will travel around the U.S., making 16 stops along the way to set up an outdoor education center with interactive displays to teach visitors about the importance of the lighting choices they make, how to use and dispose of compact fluorescent bulbs, and about the connection between personal energy use and climate. Read more

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EPA's Climate Leaders Program Grows

From an original membership of 11, the ranks of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Climate Leaders program—established in 2002 to provide guidance and recognition to companies developing and implementing corporate greenhouse gas reduction strategies—has swelled to 138 partners, which now include Osram Sylvania. Read more

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Managing Mercury: A Progress Report

all fluorescent lamps require mercury to start and operate. Once the lamp is disposed of, however, that mercury can become a hazardous substance in the environment. This problem has resulted in more than a decade of federal and state regulation that can be confusing to owners, architects and lighting professionals alike. Read more

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