RESPONSE TO SPRING 2008 LED SUPPLEMENT ARTICLE “LEDS, LIGHT, AND ARCHITECTURE.

ARCHITECTURAL LIGHTING Staff

In response to Kevin Dowling's article, bravo! Brilliant, beautiful coverage of LEDs. I have been harping on the same issues in my publications and continuing education classes for interior designers and architects, especially the fact that LEDs need not imitate our current light sources as just retrofits. LEDs can offer a complete new way to light spaces by being self-illuminated surfaces.

The last time we had this opportunity was when electroluminescence promised, among other things, being applicable for walls to create vertical brightness. It did not happen, much to my unhappiness. It probably was not commercially feasible. However, I am anxious for LEDs to become economically feasible. Hurry; hurry!

However, I would suggest changing the term “penumbra” in the subtitle—The Penumbra of a New Medium—to the term “comet.” Penumbra is a dark shadow, which I don't think LEDs are. Comets were born long ago, have a lengthy trajectory, and don't become visible until they pass Jupiter, where they become brighter and brighter as they approach Earth and we become aware of them. Previously, LEDs were in the background and we were not so aware of them.

JANE GROSSLIGHT
JANE GROSSLIGHT LIGHTING DESIGNS
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.

RESPONSE TO JUNE 2008 EDITOR'S COMMENT “TO BE OR NOT TO BE?

A LIGHTING TRADE SHOW.”

I read with interest (post-Lightfair, actually) your recent piece comparing Light+Building to Lightfair. Aside from the hospitality noted in your piece, another element that strikes me each year is the dichotomy between both fairs when it comes to customer interaction, best exemplified by a simple piece of plastic. In Frankfurt, there are no visible attendee badges. At Lightfair, we are tagged like wild game. Exhibitors at Light+Building are quick to share product details and market analysis, and will answer just about anything else relevant to their business. Not so at Lightfair. Not being tethered to a booth at Lightfair this year, I noted with amusement in Las Vegas that virtually every exchange with a customer began with the exhibitor “looking down” at the visitor's name badge in order to better frame the resulting conversation. It was quite educational.

Thanks as well on your comments regarding a biannual show. The timing conflicts between AIA and Lightfair are going to continue for the next several years. One just has to look at the march of specification-brand [lighting] manufacturers signing onto AIA to see what is happening.

RONALD S. NAUS, EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT
B-K LIGHTING + TEKA ILLUMINATION
MADERA, CALIF.

Correction In the article “Women in Lighting Design,” April/May 2008, Lesley Wheel's name was spelled incorrectly.